Breathe Easier With Low Toxicity Furniture

Creating a sustainable workplace has become vital to the reputation of an organisation, it’s almost no longer a choice, but instead, a necessity. With an overwhelming call across the globe to go green, it’s simply bad for business not to integrate sustainable initiatives into organisational planning.

For interior designers, project managers or business leaders looking to help drive sustainability in the workplace, a good (and healthy) place to start, is with low emissions furniture.

Consider the workplace; the actual size of the space, the number of employees, every piece of furniture needed to promote productivity and comfortability while also keeping a company’s brand in mind for stylistic purposes. Each piece of furniture integrated, will release substances into the air. While this isn’t necessarily something to fear, as almost everything does this, synthetic materials, or those treated with synthetic substances can be especially harmful as they contain Volatile organic compounds (VOCs). What are VOCs? We’re glad you asked!

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a large family of chemicals that contain carbon and hydrogen. They can be released into indoor air from a number of sources, including workplace furniture (flame retardants and formaldehyde being quite common). While some VOCs are more toxic than others, the health risks associated will depend on the levels you are exposed to, the length of time you are exposed, and your individual sensitivity to toxicity. Because your risk increases with exposure, and employees are logging more hours in the office than ever – introducing low emissions (or low VOC) furniture into the workplace just makes sense on so many levels.

Whether you work in an office, shop, run your own business or manage a major corporation, taking care of the environment is easier than you think. Creating a more sustainable workplace by providing optimal air quality can result in a healthier and more productive place to work, a lighter ecological footprint, a boost in staff morale and increased growth for your bottom line.

Mo-Patterned-and-Green

Inside the Designer’s Studio – Max Harper

On this edition of “Inside the Designer’s Studio” we had the pleasure to chat with Max Harper, the mind behind the Corker Light Series.

Sydney born and raised, Max’s designs were discovered by Luxmy in Milan earlier this year, we have since then started this collaboration and recently launched his amazing series of lights at Sydney Indesign 2015.

Max’s interview is inspirational and unpretentious. A must read.

1) Tell us a bit about you.

I was born and raised in Sydney, after some initially studying  drafting, I decided to go to RMIT to study industrial design where I kept my head down and ended up being a finalist for the prestigious graduate of the year award (GOTYA).

During my time at university I was lucky enough to do an exchange program in Foshan China, a large southern manufacturing hub. The time spent there really changed my perspective. So after I graduated I moved to Guangzhou a large city near Foshan, and spent a couple of years there working in 3D interactive design.

After seeing a colleague of mine do really well in Milan I wondered if that was a possibility for me so I came back to Sydney and have been doing lighting ever since.

I’ve been lucky enough to land an award at Melbourne Fringe Furniture for my Corker series in 2014, from that success I was invited to show in Milan as a part of Melbourne Movement. Melbourne Movement is a collective started by Kjell Grant to showcase Melbourne trained emerging designers in Milan during design week.

I’m currently doing projects with Australian manufacturers, as well as developing my own products and brand.

2) How did you get into design?

When I was younger I always thought I would be an architect, I ended up studying drafting and worked for an engineering firm and found out what the construction industry was all about and realised that it really wasn’t for me. I always had affinity for furniture and for products so I’d thought I’d give industrial design a go and I haven’t looked back since.

3) What would you be if not a designer?

It would be hard to think as myself as anything else, I’m quite technical so I believe I would dedicate my time to finding out how to do other things other than products and processes work.

4)  How would you describe your workspace?

It’s a little crowded, it’s a desk at home which changes roles depending on what I’m doing. I do concept development work there so I keep my sketchbook, computer for all my detailing, my 3D printer for mould making , lots of silicone and resin casting supplies.

5) What’s your favourite City and why?

My favourite city would be Hong Kong. I’ve been there about a dozen times after living in China for a couple of years. It really is a vibrant city of ultra-convenience where everything works, locals are friendly and there is always something new to discover. When you get tired of the city it’s really easy to get out and explore nature.

6) What advice would you give to a younger you?

I would tell myself that the KISS principle is golden, and try to work smart not hard.

7)  What gets you excited?

Innovative Eco-Materials.

8)  What turns you off?

6000K or cool daylight LED light globes.

9) What sound or noise do you love?

The sound of rain on a tin roof, the house I grew up in has a tin roof and I used to love falling asleep when it was raining.

10) What sound or noise do you hate?

The sound of my alarm in the morning, and waking up to that sound.

11) What’s your favourite word?

Fastidious – for me it’s fun to say, and I love its meaning.

12) What’s your least favourite word?

Congeal – it just conjures up graphic visualizations for me.

13) If you have to wake up in someone else’s body, who that person would be?

(Does anyone have a good answer to this question?)

The assistant of Marc Newson, I probably wouldn’t want the stress of running his studio but rather be an onlooker and see how the projects develop as an outsider.

 

 

 

Write-On Veneer

A veneer wall or table top that you can write on, that is superior in quality and can be easily cleaned?

This is all possible thanks to Luxmy’s Write-On texture. The applications and possibilities are endless: from the offices, schools and university walls, to restaurants menu boards, collaboration and meeting rooms, the Write-On texture can be applied to any veneer surface.

Send us an enquiry today.

 

 

 

 

 

Sydney Indesign – Event Wrap Up

So much happened at our showroom during Sydney Indesign 2015.

From a fun and exciting photo booth to an engaging and meaningful DQ talk (hosted by Luxmy Furniture) where we discussed the future of authentic design and the problem of replicas on the Australian market, to an amazing wrap up party that brought those 2 days to a perfect end.

Our guests started the Saturday Indesign morning with insights and ideas on how we move forward to solve the problem of replicas that is eminent on the Australian market. Our panel consisted of House Rules judge Joe Snell, award winning designer Charles Wilson, Senior Design Examiner for IP Australia Oliver Bennet and a few more special guests. It was an one hour light-hearted discussion where different concerns were raised and diverse points of view were discussed, making it interesting and memorable.

Our photo booth was heaps of fun!

As part of The Project for Sydney Indesign, the Hill Street Precinct exhibitors (including Luxmy Furniture, Workshopped, Arthur G and Euroluce) teamed up with Design by Toko to create a visual protest on replica furniture. This was called the Hill Street Bonfire and was built by the students from the Whitehouse Institute of Design.

Sydney Indesign’s Wrap Party rose the Whitehouse Institute of Design roof. Big names of the Design scene were reunited around the dance floor on the “The Industry’s most iconic bash”.

Luxmy hosted the Pre-Wrap Party in our pop up space:

Thank you to all who visited our showroom!

The Luxmy Furniture team.

Hill Street Bonfire

The Hill Street Precinct Project came together as part of Sydney Indesign  and as a collaboration of 4 amazing teams from Workshopped, Euroluce, Arthur G and Luxmy Furniture.

Like an unison of like-minded people seeking to make a valid statement on the problem of replicas, we’ve teamed up with the creative minds from Design by Toko and with the assistance of the Whitehouse Institute of Design, created a provoking statement in the shape of a 3.5 meters tall ‘Bonfire of Replicas’.

“It takes thousands of dollars and a huge amount of creativity and hard work to produce original design. After all the prototyping, tooling and marketing expenses involved in commercialisation, it is heartbreaking to see works from our collection and fellow local businesses ruthlessly ripped off with no respect for the designer or manufacturer involved in bringing that product to life. It’s time to take a stand!” says Priyanka Rao of Luxmy Furniture.

You can still visit the sculpture until the 23rd of August at 2 Short Street, Surry Hills – Sydney, NSW.

 

Future of Authentic Design

As part of Sydney Indesign, we will be hosting a DQ Round Table for a balanced and positive discussion on the problem of replicas and the solutions going forward.

Our star studded panel will consist of House Rules judge Joe Snell, Award winning designer Charles Wilson, Senior Design Examiner for IP Australia Kylie Murray and a few more special guests in a discussion moderated by Design Quartely Editor Sophia Watson.

Get your tickets today and join us Saturday the 15th of August at Whitehouse Institute of Design at 10am.

See you at Sydney Indesign!

Two Tones Pablo Chair

How beautiful the 2 toned Pablo Chairs look on this great project for Teleflex?

We absolutely loved the results and were very pleased with all positive feedback:

“The Pablo was the perfect fit as it was on a short lead time, could be powder coated and most importantly have 2 tones upholstery. We were very impressed with the consultative approach Luxmy adopted for this project.

Luxmy guided us and the designer towards a solution that would not only be technically suitable and fit within the lead time but that also added onto the design intent.”, says Raphael Bicard from Workarena.

 

A big well done to: Our clients at Workarena and to designers Erin Donelley and Kristelle Fiori from WMK and Construction managers / Project managers (Ed Lau) from MPA.